Hermit in the Himalayas: The Journal of a Lonely Exile

Hermit in the Himalayas: The Journal of a Lonely Exile

Paul Brunton was born in London in 1898 and died in Switzerland as recently as 1981.
Paul Brunton (October 21, 1898 – July 27, 1981) was probably born as Hermann Hirsch of German Jewish origin. Later he changed his name to Raphael Hurst, and then Brunton Paul and finally Paul Brunton. He was a British philosopher, mystic, traveler, and guru. He left a journalistic career to live among yogis, mystics, and holy men, and studied Eastern and Western esoteric teachings. Dedicating his life to an inward and spiritual quest, Brunton felt charged to communicate his experiences about what he had learned in the East to others. His works had a major influence on the spread of Eastern yoga and mysticism to the West. Taking pains to express his thoughts in layperson’s terms, Brunton was able to present what he had learned from the Orient and from ancient tradition as a living wisdom. His writings express his view that meditation and the inward quest are not exclusively for monks and hermits, but will also support those living normal, active lives in the Western world.

If Brunton can not be credited with introducing Yoga to the West because of the existence of other previous luminaries such as Blavatsky, Vivekananda and Yogananda, at least he holds a preeminent position in bringing to the West the best the Orient has to offer: the doctrine of Mentalism. No other writer but Brunton has declared Mentalism to be the esoteric doctrine of the Orient. Brunton is also the only writer to differentiate Oriental Mentalism from Berkeley’s
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Books by PB
http://paulbrunton.org/pb.php
• A Search in Secret India
• The Secret Path
• A Search in Secret Egypt
• A Message from Arunachala
• A Hermit in the Himalayas
• The Quest of the Overself
• The Inner Reality
• Indian Philosophy and Modern Culture
• The Hidden Teaching Beyond Yoga
• The Wisdom of the Overself
• The Spiritual Crisis of Man
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Hermit in the Himalayas: The Journal of a Lonely Exile
Paperback, 188 pages
Published June 1st 1984 by Red Wheel Weiser (first published 1937)
Paul Brunton was born in London in 1898 and died in Switzerland as recently as 1981.
Paul Brunton (October 21, 1898 – July 27, 1981) was probably born as Hermann Hirsch of German Jewish origin. Later he changed his name to Raphael Hurst, and then Brunton Paul and finally Paul Brunton. He was a British philosopher, mystic, traveler, and guru. He left a journalistic career to live among yogis, mystics, and holy men, and studied Eastern and Western esoteric teachings. Dedicating his life to an inward and spiritual quest, Brunton felt charged to communicate his experiences about what he had learned in the East to others. His works had a major influence on the spread of Eastern yoga and mysticism to the West. Taking pains to express his thoughts in layperson’s terms, Brunton was able to present what he had learned from the Orient and from ancient tradition as a living wisdom. His writings express his view that meditation and the inward quest are not exclusively for monks and hermits, but will also support those living normal, active lives in the Western world.


If Brunton can not be credited with introducing Yoga to the West because of the existence of other previous luminaries such as Blavatsky, Vivekananda and Yogananda, at least he holds a preeminent position in bringing to the West the best the Orient has to offer: the doctrine of Mentalism. No other writer but Brunton has declared Mentalism to be the esoteric doctrine of the Orient. Brunton is also the only writer to differentiate Oriental Mentalism from Berkeley’s
This book is part travelogue through what is still a fairly remore region of the world and part spiritual experience. The book was originally published in 1938, at a time when few outsiders ventured as far as Mount Kailas.
Author: Paul Brunton
Publishers: Rider Books
Pages: 188
http://www.amazon.com/Hermit-Himalayas-Paul-Brunton/dp/B0007G3U9U
‘’ One of the great classics of spiritual literature brought back into print Paul Brunton was one of a very small number of his generation to travel so extensively throughout India and Tibet at a time when very few were doing so with such insight and discernment. His journalistic skills produced magnificent descriptions of the snowy peaks and high-desert landscapes of the Himalayan region but it was the lessons he learned from the holy men he met on his journey that transformed him into one of the great interpreters of the East. In this magnificent classic he explains that we all need ‘oases of calm in a world of storm’, no matter what era we are living in, and that to retreat from our everyday lives for a while is not weakness but strength. By taking the trouble to discover the deep silence within us we will find the benefits of being linked to an ‘infinite power, an infinite wisdom, an infinite goodness’. A Hermit In The Himalayas is a fascinating blend of travel narrative and profound spiritual experience. As we accompany the author on his journey through the vast Himalayas ranges towards Mount Kailas in Tibet, he also shows us an even more remarkable – and timeless – inner path which will help us cope with the ups and downs of our contemporary world.’’
This book is in continuation with earlier book from Paul Brunton – ‘A Search in Secret India’, where Brunton travels around the country looking for a spiritual master. Having found one and learned from him, he sets off to isolation, now to practice.


‘A Hermit in the Himalayas’ describes Brunton’s days living in a secluded place in the mountains of Himachal Pradesh, away from rest of the world trying to meditate and learn to calm the mind. The book is mostly written like journal of his days of living in the mountains besides his reflection and attempts to meditate. He is not completely isolated from the world though, but has a servant to help him in his everyday activities, receives his letters regularly and responds to them and has some uninvited visitors, in all of which he finds things to write about, besides focusing on keeping his mind calm.
It would be difficult for the reader to perceive how one could write much sitting in a place isolated, but as one starts reading, it is evident that Brunton has enough to catch the attention. Read this as a continuation to ‘A Search in Secret India’
A truly absorbing, beautiful little book that takes you into the very heart of the tranquility of the Himalayas at a time before the conquest of Everest.

This is Paul Brunton’s journel of his time in search of stillness; the inner silence of a higher state meditation. It is a book full of insight and wisdom as he pens his daily musings on life and Nature with beautiful, vivid descriptions of a time spent surrounded by breathtaking beauty.
He is a philospher talking of many things, travel, politics, religion, a chapter in which he replies to his correspondence and, in answer to a man on the brink of suicide, a letter so uplifting and full of compassion that it touched my heart. Another on silent movies and Charlie Chaplin, that lovable funny character of the silent era.

’’ “The mysterious manner in which this growing sense of unity commingles with a sense of utter goodness is worth noting. It arises by no effort of mine; rather does it come to me out of I know not where. Harmony appears gradually and flows through my whole being like music. An infinite tenderness takes possession of me, smoothing away the harsh cynicism which a reiterated experience of human ingratitude and human treachery has driven deeply into my temperament. I feel the fundamental benignity of Nature despite the apparent manifestation of ferocity. Like the sounds of every instrument in an orchestra that is in tune, all things and all people seem to drop into the sweet relationship that subsists within the Great Mother’s own heart.” ‘’


This book was first published in 1937, Paul Brunton was a British journalist who later took a turning for spiritual philosophy. In India he came in contact with various spiritual leaders, saints, mystics and yogis of that time mainly Ramana Maharishi, Kanchipuram Shankracharya & Meher Baba among others.

Paul Brunton wanted to visit Tibet, Mount Kailash in particular (as he says) not as a ‘trader nor geographer’ but for a ‘higher purpose’. He was denied permission by the authorities in command and he decided to carry on his quest in Tehri Garhwal, in comparative solitude among the majestic Himalayas.
Though largely solitary his Himalayan sojourn was occasionally interrupted by visits from persons of his acquaintance, one of them the Prince Mussooree Shum Shere Jung Bahadur Rana of Nepal (who has written the foreword for this book) with whom Brunton roams around the hilly terrain and also pens down some thrilling anecdotes told by the Prince. Another time he was visited by Swami Pranavananda with whom Brunton shares an immensely spiritual experience. There is one chapter wholly dedicated to Charlie Chaplin whose genius is held in high regards by Brunton.
Throughout the narrative Brunton’s reverence for the Himalayas is evident, if you too have seen the lofty, rugged sentinel you’d know how the Himalayas inspire awe in us mortals. The search for innerself or as Brunton says ‘overself’ is eternal for the humankind and so as such this book is relevant even now…

Aacharya Shambu Nambudirippad Doing Serene Havan

BREATHING THERAPY

The nose has a left and a right side; we use both to inhale and exhale. Actually they are different; you would be able to feel the difference.

*
The right side represents the Sun and
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The left side represents the Moon.

1.
During a headache try to close your right nose and use your left nose to breathe. In about five min, you feel recovery from headache.
2.
If you feel tired, just reverse the process; close your left nose and use your right nose to breathe.
After a while you feel your mind is refreshed.

*
Right side(Sun) belongs to “hot” , hence it gets heated up easily
*
Left side(Moon) belongs to “cold”, hence the soothing effect.

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Most female breathe with their left noses, hence female get “cooled off” faster.
*
Most of the guys utilize more of the right nose, they get worked up.

Do you notice the moment we wake up, which side breathes faster? Left or Right ??? If left is faster,you will feel tired. So, close your left nose and use your right nose for breathing, you will get refreshed quickly.

This can be taught to kids, but it is more effective when practiced by adults.

Pranayam teaches us this. Closing one nose , first exhale and inhale thru the other, then by closing the other exhale and inhale thru the 1st. Continuing this process several times , you get totally refreshed. Hence can be used as a precaution than cure for headache, cold and throat/nose/ lungs infections. Beware that you are in empty stomach and sit upright in lotus posture or sit on a chair upright with legs crossed. Right hand thumb and any other fingure can be used for closing nose on both sides alternately.

There are seven spiritual charkas in our body, embodying the awakening of the spirit, work in tandem to vitalize and enrich the mind and body.

1)Muladhara (Root) Chakra::–is located in the base of the spine (Color-Golden yellow, Element-Earth, Bij Mantra-LAM), is home to the Kundalini and it’s main aspect is innocence and purity. This reservoir of force symbolizes objective consciousness, the awareness in the physical & terrestrial universe and maintain peace. Good for health if you meditate on this charka.


2)Svadhihana (Sacral) Chakra::–is located slightly below the belly button (Color-Orange, Element-Water and Bij Mantra-VAM), is the charka of creativity, undivided attention and pure knowledge. It is the one which allows partners to reach the inner source of inspiration, and enables them to experience the celestial aura created thus. Meditating on this charka will increase psychic capacities, genial creative imagination, intuitive knowledge, imprisoning passions, anger, attachments, vanity, jealousy and other physical impurities. Also increases regenerative capacity and finally overcomes death.

3)Manipura (Solar) Chakra::–is located one hand span above the belly button (Color-Golden, Element-Fire and Bij Mantra-RAM), is one that gives the sense of generosity, complete satisfaction and contentment. It represents expansive consciousness and the desire for power. The main quality of this chakra is peace. By meditating on this chakra, it gives ability of discovering hidden treasures, person is never touched by illness and his fear of death gets diminished.

4)Anahata (Heart) Chakra::– is located in the centre of the chest (in the area of the cardiac plexus) (Color-Green, Element-Air and Bij Mantra-YAM), symbolizes the consciousness of love, empathy, selflessness and devotion. This is the place wherein resides one’s true self, which is eternally pure and unaffected by anything. Meditating on this chakra, helps normal functioning of the heart and lungs, to get rid of Asthma, keeps blood pressure normal.

5)Vishudhi (Throat) Chakra::–is located in the base of the throat (above where it joins the chest) (Color-Sky Blue, Element-Space, Bij Mantra-HAM), symbolizes pure consciousness and creativity. It is the chakra of pure relationships with others. It also signifies playful detachment, maintains mutual trust and cooperation. Meditating on this chakra, removes all our guilt and remorse when it is opened by the Kundalini and gives us a kind and compassionate voice., removes the feelings of superiority or inferiority and all jealousies & enhances ability to telepathy and clairaudience.

6)Ajna (Brow) Chakra::–is located at the exact centre of forehead.(Element- Brahma, Bij Mantra-AAM), represents the superior mental consciousness that favors the direct perception over the invisible worlds and the direct perception of the subtle aspects of manifestation. The level of consciousness where misunderstanding never occur. Meditating on this Chakra, gives great mental insight, self control, clairvoyance, superior intuition and extra sensorial perception, gets rid of blunt past life karmas, enhances person’s ability to tune in to the highest or deepest levels existence that is , the Tao, Dharma or Boddhisatva.
7)Sahasrara (Crown) Chakra::–is the state of super consciousness, which is to be experienced. The experienced cannot disclose or explain his experience, when the creator and the created become one, where the knower, knowledge and known all the same.
It is a mix of yoga, meditation and pranayama which enables the kundalini to raise from Muladhara to Ajna and attain the state of being in Sahasrara, Aham Brahmasmi, Tatvamasi.

Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum Aum

The Gayatri Mantra Studies 1

Gayatri Mantra in Sanskrit

The Gayatri mantra to Savitri, an important form of the Sun God, is the most important of all Vedic man-tras and one of the most commonly used mantras in Yoga practices. The Gayatri mantra is an important tool for drawing in the spiritual energy of the Sun into our minds, hearts and bodies.

Amme !

We meditate upon the supreme light of the Divine trans-forming Sun (Savitri) that he may stimulate our intelligence.
Rigveda III.62.10
mantra

Vedic rituals, including Agnihotra and the chanting of the Gayatri mantra, oc-cur at sunrise, noon and sunset, the main points of solar transformation throughout the day. The deity of this mantra Savitri, represents the transforma-tional power inherent in the Sun, not only to change night into day but also to take us beyond the dark-ness of the ego into the infi-nite light of the higher Self.
Gayatri Devi

Savitri is the deity of Yoga and meditation, who sets that process in motion within us as a manifesta-tion of the Divine Will. Yet we should remember that this Gayatri is only one of hundreds of Vedic verses to the Sun that can be used in a similar manner. It is not at unique in the Vedas…..
Gayatri Devi Goddess

Advaithashramam, Kolathur

Sath Chith Aanandam
was established in October 1992. Kolathur is a serene village, some 24 Kilometers from Kozhikode city in Kerala State, South India. The Ashramam offers an opportunity to study the profound spiritual knowledge of the Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita, Brahmasutras, and other classical Vedic texts in the traditional way.The Ashramam also publishes many books on various topics in Sanathana Dharma and Vedanta. Sree Kolathoorappan Kshethram, a temple having a history of thousands of years is situated in this village. Main deity of this temple is Lord Narasimha.
Sree Vallorakkavu Kshetram is another hoary temple in this village, the main deity being Kiratha Siva. The then owner of the land, Sree Mangalassery Narayana Swami handed over Sree Vallorakkavu Kshethram along with a land of 56 cents around the temple to a committee, named Sree Vallorakkavu Kshethra Samithi, registered under the Indian Societies Registration Act in the year 1992. Swami Chidananda Puri is the Patron of this committee from its very beginning. Besides conducting the daily services in the temple, the committee is running the Advaithashramam, a centre for the propagation of the Sanathana Dharma and Vedanta Philosophy

Proud to Be an Indian !

Source<>

1. The official Sanskrit name for India is Bharat.

2. INDIA has been called Bharat even in Satya yuga (Golden Age).

3. The name `India’ is derived from the River Indus, the valleys around which were the home of the early settlers. The Aryan worshippers referred to the river Indus as the Sindhu.

4. The Persian invaders converted it into Hindu. The name `Hindustan’ combines Sindhu and Hindu and thus refers to the land of the Hindus.

5. The number system was invented by India. Aryabhatta was the scientist who invented the digit zero.

6. Sanskrit is considered as the mother of all higher languages. This is because it is the most precise, and therefore suitable language for computer software. (a report in Forbes magazine, July 1987 ).

7. Chess was invented in India.

Step forward,We are Lions

8. Algebra, Trigonometry and Calculus are studies, which originated in India. The’ place value system’ and the ‘decimal system’ were developed in 100 BC in India.

9. The first six Mogul Emperor’s of India ruled in an unbroken succession from father to son for two hundred years, from 1526 to 1707.

10. The World’s First Granite Temple is the Brihadeswara temple at Tanjavur in Tamil Nadu. The shikhara is made from a single ‘ 80-tonne ‘ piece of granite. Also, this magnificient temple was built in just five years, (between 1004 AD and 1009 AD) during the reign of Rajaraja Chola

11. India is…….the Largest democracy in the world, the 6th largest country in the world AND one of the most ancient and living civilizations (at least 10, 000 years old).

We are Such Stuff that Stars are made of..!

12. The 13th century poet saint Gyandev created the game of snakes & ladders. It was originally called ‘Mokshapat.’ The ladders in the game represented virtues and the snakes indicated vices. The game was played with cowrie shells and dices. Later through time, the game underwent several modifications but the meaning is the same i.e good deeds take us to heaven and evil to a cycle of re-births.

13. The world’s highest cricket ground is in Chail, Himachal Pradesh. Built in 1893 after levelling a hilltop, this cricket pitch is 2444 meters above sea level.

14. India has the most post offices in the world.

15. The largest employer in the world is the Indian railway system, employing over a million people.

16. The World’s first university was established in Takshila in 700 BC. More than 10,500 students from all over the world studied more than 60 subjects. The University of Nalanda built in the 4th century was one of the greatest achievements of ancient India in the field of education.

Spontaneous and Flexible we are, But as high and Strong as our Himaalayas

17. Ayurveda is the earliest school of medicine known to mankind. The father of medicine, Charaka, consolidated Ayurveda 2500 years ago.

18. Although modern images & descriptions of India often show poverty, India was one of the richest countries till the time of British in the early 17th Century. Christopher Columbus was attracted by India’s wealth and was looking for route to India when he discovered America by mistake.

19. The art of Navigation & Navigating was born in the river Sindh 6000 over years ago. The very word ‘Navigation’ is derived from the Sanskrit word NAVGATIH. The word navy is also derived from the Sanskrit word ‘Nou’.

20. Bhaskaracharya rightly calculated the time taken by the earth to orbit the sun hundreds of years before the astronomer Smart. His calculations were – Time taken by earth to orbit the sun: (5th century) 365.258756484 days.

21. The Indian Mathematician Budhayana first calculated the value of “pi”, and he explained the concept of what is known as the Pythagorean theorem. He discovered this in the 6th century, which was long before the European mathematicians.

22. Algebra, trigonometry and calculus also originated from India. Quadratic equations were used by Sridharacharya in the 11th century. The largest numbers the Greeks and the Romans used were 106 whereas Hindus used numbers as big as 10*53 (i.e 10 to the power of 53) with specific names as early as 5000 B.C. during the Vedic period. Even today, the largest used number is Tera: 10*12(10 to the power of 12).

23. Until 1896, India was the only source for diamonds to the world. (Source. Gemological Institute of America)

24. The Baily Bridge is the highest bridge in the world. It is located in the Ladakh valley between the Dras and Suru rivers in the Himalayan Mountains. The Indian Army built it in August 1982.

never to YIELD...!

25. Sushruta is regarded as the father of surgery. Over 2600 years ago Sushrata & his team conducted complicated surgeries like cataract, artificial limbs, cesareans, fractures, urinary stones and also plastic surgery and brain surgeries.

26. Usage of anesthesia was well known in ancient India medicine. Detailed knowledge of anatomy, embryology, digestion, metabolism, physiology, etiology, genetics and immunity is also found in many ancient Indian texts